[Toilet paper wants to be a basketball]Wisconsin Republicans’ plan to break statewide losing streak? Get conservatives on local ballots now

  Tyler Martinez is kissed by his fiancée, Vanessa Gaona, with whom he has two daughters, moments after Martinez was sentenced to spend five years in prison for the fatal hit-and-run crash that killed Michael Fuchsgruber?on Oct. 20, 2017 in Caledonia. Martinez and Gaona were quickly pulled apart by deputies in the courtroom.

  ADAM ROGAN,

  In the early days of the pandemic, there was a rush on household goods, leading to empty shelves of everything from toilet paper to milk and eggs to cleaning supplies, although disruptions to the supply chain were rarely as pronounced as many feared.

  STEPHANIE JONES, Journal Times file photo

  Rhonda Robinson of Chicago, right, joins family for breakfast on March 17 at Meli Cafe,?1158 Prairie Drive, Mount Pleasant. Robinson had a cough and, out of consideration to others, she wore a surgical mask. Effective at 5 p.m. that day, Gov. Tony Evers ordered all bars and restaurants in the state to close except for carry-out service.?

  Stephanie Jones

  The Rev. Mike Matheson of Grace Church, 3626 Green Bay Road, Caledonia, prays as he leads church services livestreamed on Facebook Live on the morning of March 22. Many places of worship have returned to in-person but socially distanced gatherings, although livestreamed services have remained as a norm throughout the year.

  Gregory Shaver, For the Journal Times

  Rosalyn Smith, with the City of Racine Health Department, checks the temperature of a voter on as she enters City Hall on May 25. City health workers checked temperatures as a precaution to keep poll workers safe because of the coronavirus pandemic. Mayor Cory Mason was one of those calling for all voting to be by mail this year, an effort that was unsuccessful.

  Gregory Shaver, For the Journal Times

  A sign posted alongside Highway 38, just south of Hood Creek Road near the roundabout in Caledonia, expresses solidarity in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. This photo was taken in March.

  Christina Lieffring

  Cousins Teresa McMorris, left, and Tiara Harrell gather at Harrell’s house to sew filtered masks they donate to health care facilities and first responders in Racine, Kenosha and Milwaukee counties. Community members made a significant difference in the early days of the pandemic as traditional manufacturers struggled to catch up with demand for personal protective equipment.

  CHRISTINA LIEFFRING,

  During an extraordinary and nearly postponed April election, Assembly Speaker Robin Vos, R-Rochester, talks to a member of the media while working as a poll worker in Burlington.?“You are incredibly safe to go out,” he told viewers while wearing required personal protective equipment in a video that was shared widely on social media throughout the day.

  STEPHANIE JONES, Journal Times file photo

  A Downtown Racine resident uses two phones to repeatedly call the Department of Workforce Development’s unemployment hotline in April. She said she’s been doing this for weeks with varied frequency, as her unemployment claim remains on hold with the state. Wait times to have unemployment claims often stretched for weeks, with the state’s overwhelmed system and inability to correct the problem made it difficult for thousands of Wisconsinites to make ends meet.

  Submitted photo

  2020 was a year rife with recounts. Racine didn’t avoid that. Pictured here: City of Racine finance and clerk’s office staff conduct a recount April 17 of the more than 1,400 ballots cast in the April 7 election in City Council District 12, where incumbent Alderman Henry Perez defeated challenger Stacy Sheppard by three votes, according to the initial count.

  ADAM ROGAN,

  2020 was a year rife with recounts. Racine didn’t avoid that. Pictured here: Members of the Racine Unified Board of Canvass, standing to the right, look over Caledonia ballots in question on April 18, the first day of the Racine Unified referendum recount, which had not been successful in overturning the narrow passage of a $1 billion referendum.

  Stephanie Jones

  A man and a girl swing at Echo Park in Burlington on May 2 during a ReOpen Burlington protest, even though all playgrounds in Wisconsin had been declared off limits at the time. Stay-at-home rules, and the enforcement of those rules, have varied between states and even within municipalities within states across the U.S.

  ADAM ROGAN,

  ReOpen Burlington demonstrators hold “Don’t Tread On Me” and “Trump” and “Reopen Wisconsin” flags and posters along Milwaukee Avenue in May amid statewide protests opposing the soon-to-be-overturned Safer At Home order.

  ADAM ROGAN,

  From the beginning of the year through Christmas Day, 2,792,718 COVID-19 tests were performed in Wisconsin; about one-third of all those tests were performed by the Wisconsin National Guard. In Racine County, 108,771 such tests have been performed, with more than 16,800 cases of the novel coronavirus confirmed and 246 deaths confirmed in the county. Pictured here, a man is tested for COVID-19 by a National Guard member, who uses a swab to gather material from inside both of the man’s nostrils in the parking lot of Burlington High School, 400 McCanna Parkway, during the busy first day of community testing in Racine County. The man’s face has been blurred by The Journal Times to protect his identity.

  Gregory Shaver, For the Journal Times

  Hospital workers wait for the four F-16 Fighting Falcon fighter aircraft from the Wisconsin Air National Guard to flyover Ascension All Saints Hospital on a May evening as part of the nationwide “Operation American Resolve” campaign intended to “show appreciation for the thousands of heroes on the front lines, as well as the brave citizens and neighbors who have been battling and supporting the COVID-19 response. The flyover is considered part of a regular training and proficiency mission, which is a required training to be completed by pilots to remain up to date on qualifications.

  Gregory Shaver, For the Journal Times

  Summer Davis wears a face shield while standing behind the bar at?The Maple Table, 520 Main St. on May 26, the first day Racine restaurants could reopen following closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  ADAM ROGAN,

  Face masks remain mandatory inside Waterford High School, as shown at last year’s graduation ceremony, after officials recently asked students and staff whether they supported relaxing the requirement for the rest of the school year.

  Journal Times file photo

  Kylie Gelmi, who was later charged with arson and burglary for allegedly setting fire to the Thelma Orr COP House, raises one fist while waving a flag that reads?”Life over property / Truth over Power / Black lives MATTER” while backed by about 20 Black Lives Matter demonstrators raising both fists in the air at around 11:30 p.m. on May 31.?

  ADAM ROGAN,

  Protesters yell at Racine Police officers when a march arrives at the Racine Police Department on Center Street in Downtown Racine in the early morning hours of June 1. At the police station, some in the crowd started throwing rocks and bricks at officers, leading to tear gas being used to disperse the crowd after a Black Lives Matter demonstration started hours earlier on Monument Square following the death of George Floyd the week prior.

  ADAM ROGAN,

  A group of protesters sit on Main Street on June 1 during an afternoon protest that brought hundreds chanting “SAY HIS NAME!” and “BLACK LIVES MATTER!” to the streets of Racine on a day of peaceful protesting that followed a tense night in which the Thelma Orr COP House was set on fire.

  CHRISTINA LIEFFRING, Journal Times file photo

  Demonstrators on Washington Avenue in Uptown wave signs and cheer as cars driving past, and driving below on Memorial Drive, honk in support during a peaceful protest on June 1, less than a week after George Floyd was killed in Minneapolis.

  LAUREN HENNING, Journal Times file photo

  Protesters carried signs calling for peace, justice and recognition of the Black Lives Matter movement while marching down Highway 75 in Kansasville in June as international demonstrations reached rural America.

  ADAM ROGAN,

  Diane Christensen collects baby products for her grandchildren last Saturday afternoon during a giveaway from Kingdom Manna in the parking lot of Horlick Field, 1801 N. Memorial Drive. Giveaways like this one, some privately run and others public, have become more well-trafficked and relied upon as the rates of those who are out of work have skyrocketed amid the pandemic.

  ADAM ROGAN,

  NBA All-Star and Racine native Caron Butler takes the megaphone to address the crowd at a Juneteenth rally on June 19. Hundreds took to the streets in Racine and in Burlington, joining thousands nationwide, to protest racial injustices and celebrate progress on the holiday commemorating the freeing of the last American slaves in Texas more than 150 years ago.

  ADAM ROGAN,

  Juneteenth marchers from the allied section of Racine’s Juneteenth demonstration make their way down 14th Street on June 19, led by Carl Fields with the megaphone.

  ADAM ROGAN, JOURNAL TIMES FILE PHOTO

  George Floyd is just one of the names on the graves of the victims of police violence placed in Burlington during the city’s first-ever Juneteenth rally.

  Lauren Henning

  Audience members listen to speakers during the Juneteenth rally at Echo Lake Park in Burlington on June 19, 2020.

  LAUREN HENNING, Journal Times file photo

  Burlington Police Chief Mark Anderson, center, bows his head during a prayer that was part of Burlington’s Juneteenth celebration on June 19, 2020, at Echo Lake Park.

  LAUREN HENNING, Journal Times file photo

  The above screenshot is from the first meeting of the Mayor’s Task Force on Police Reform, which took place July 6. Not only was 2020 a year loaded with talks of police reform, but also a year when unprecedented amounts of social and professional and public interaction took place online?— much of it via Zoom.

  Christina Lieffring

  Jordan Mogren arrived to Park High School drive-up graduation ceremony on July 9 through the sun roof and received a kiss from his mother receiving his diploma.

  LAUREN HENNING,

  Heavy rainfall on Aug. 2 knocked down most of the grassy bluff between the Zoo Beach trail and the lake. By Aug. 4, that bluff was almost gone, and the ground underneath the trail itself was exposed. The city officially closed the beach on Tuesday.

  Christina Lieffring

  Annemarie Sawkins (left) and Diane Levesque (right) take in the art after the Racine Art Museum reopened on Aug. 5 as normalcy ever-so-slowly returns to the area while the pandemic rages on.

  Lauren Henning

  While the typical Rotary Post Prom was held months later than the norm and was heavily changed from the norm, many St. Catherine’s High School graduates and their dates gathered for a prom of their own at?Roma Lodge on Spring Street on Aug. 8.

  LAUREN HENNING, Journal Times file photo

  The sight of empty streets in Downtown Milwaukee was even more apparent on the afternoon of Aug. 17 than it has been throughout the pandemic. The Democratic National Convention was supposed to bring 50,000 people and $200 million of revenue to Milwaukee. Instead, the coronavirus has pushed the DNC online and left Milwaukee looking sleepy.

  ADAM ROGAN,

  The Danish Brotherhood Lodge at 2206 63rd St. explodes while on fire, reportedly the result of rioters shortly before 11 p.m. on Aug. 24.

  TERRY FLORES

  Demonstrators crowd around an armored vehicle at Civic Center Park on the night of Aug. 25 in Kenosha.

  Sean Krajacic, Lee Newspapers

  Demonstrators sit on Sheridan Road in front of a line of law enforcement after being forced to leave Civic Center Park on Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2020.

  KENOSHA NEWS PHOTO BY SEAN KRAJACIC

  A woman bleeding from the head after getting hit with a rubber bullet is looked over by medics on Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2020.

  LEE NEWSPAPERS PHOTO BY SEAN KRAJACIC

  Law enforcement blocks off access to a burning vehicle on 63rd Street on Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2020.

  LEE NEWSPAPERS PHOTO BY SEAN KRAJACIC

  Kyle Rittenhouse walks along Sheridan Road in Kenosha on Aug. 25 with another armed civilian hours before before Rittenhouse, a 17-year-old from Illinois, shot three people, killing two of them during protests following the police shooting and paralyzation of Jacob Blake in Kenosha two days prior. Rittenhouse said he was in Kenosha to protect people. He is facing homicide and underage gun possession charges in a case that has become a cultural touchstone, with some calling him a cold-hearted killer and others painting him as a hero for using self-defense against a so-called “Black Lives Matter mob.” This Journal Times photo is one of only a few showing the teen prior to the shooting, and has been published dozens if not hundreds of times by outlets ranging from Yahoo! News to The New York Times to ABC News.

  ADAM ROGAN,

  Dozens of people turned out on the night of Sept. 14 at the Burlington High School gym for a School Board meeting during which a fourth-grade teacher’s methods about teaching about racial issues were debated.

  DAVE FIDLIN, For The Journal Times

  In this September photo, the Foxconn Technology Group’s?100-foot-tall High-Performance Computing Data Center is topped off, with the work being led by construction manager Mortenson. The data center is located along Highway H.

  Submitted photo

  Dalquavis Ward, pictured here on Sept. 25, has been sentenced to spend the rest of his life in prison for the killing of Racine Police Officer John Hetland on June 17, 2019 at Teezers Bar and Grill. Hetland, who was off-duty, was killed trying to stop a robbery of the restaurant, of which Ward was convicted.

  (c) Mark Hertzberg/Pool via ZUMA Press

  ADAM ROGAN, LEE NEWSPAPERS

  Paying his respects, Alliaes Williams, 18, signs a basketball Sunday afternoon at a makeshift memorial erected in tribute to Racine man/former Horlick basketball standout Marcus D. Caldwell Jr., who was killed in a apparent shooting on the evening of Oct. 17 on Yout Street.

  Eric Johnson

  Pete Buttigieg — the?ex-mayor of South Bend, Indiana, and?former presidential candidate who has endorsed Joe Biden — stopped at Caledonia’s River Bend Nature Center on the afternoon of Oct. 22 to speak with local Democrats and the press about the election, which Racine City Council President John Tate II (who helped introduce Buttigieg) called “the most consequential election of our lifetimes.” During a brief speech spoken while wearing a mask that read simply “VOTE,” Buttigieg took aim at President Donald Trump on several fronts, from his role in race relations to his handling of COVID-19 to the economy. He said, with less than two weeks left until the end of voting, Democrats should work to connect with two groups of people: those who have not decided who they want to vote for, and those who do not yet have a plan to vote. Before leaving Wisconsin — following earlier stumps in Green Bay and Milwaukee — Buttigieg said he plans to stop at “the Cheese Castle.”

  ADAM ROGAN,

  Dozens of vehicles rolled through Racine on Oct. 24, honking their horns and cheering, encouraging people in the city to “vote” as part of a series of “Pack the Polls” car parades held across Wisconsin that day. Among the drivers was?Jean Brosseau, showing off her “VOTE” mask. High turnout in more urban areas, like Milwaukee and Milwaukee, has been credited with helping propel Joe Biden to the presidency.

  ADAM ROGAN,

  Amid a shouting match during a Burlington Area School Board meeting Nov. 9, Matt Allen points to his “All Lives Matter” sign while others chant “Black Lives Matter” during a meeting that was cut short as protesters “shut it down.” Nov. 9’s meeting was one of many moments where Burlington made headlines as the predominantly Caucasian community faces continuous allegations of racism in its schools, and the School Board has been charged with addressing that.

  ADAM ROGAN,

  Staff at Lakeview Pharmacy on Racine’s Monument Square work while wearing face coverings, in accordance with health codes and the statewide mask mandate from Gov. Tony Evers’ office that is likely to be extended into January by order of the governor. On Nov. 18, Evers said he will be making a new order to extend the mask mandate, which otherwise would have expired on Saturday, although the extension didn’t really have legal teeth to extend the mandate. In this photo, from left to right, are Kaylen Hollis, Niki Monin and Tucker Stewart.

  ADAM ROGAN,

  Santa Claus, with his face covered by a mask, talks with a boy during the Union Grove Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony on the night of Dec. 3 in the Village Square. That event was one such attempt by local authorities to provide “normal” holiday celebrations while still implementing precautions that aimed to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

  GREGORY SHAVER, FOR THE JOURNAL TIMES

  Renaissance Lutheran parents, students and teachers react as a driver honks in support of their march through Racine to protest the portion of the city’s Safer Racine ordinance that orders all K-12 school buildings closed from Nov. 27 to Jan. 15. Schools have been one of many legal battlegrounds, along with elections and mask orders, of how much power governments have, even under extenuating circumstances like a 100-year pandemic.

  CAITLIN SIEVERS,

  JR Lukenbill, a sophomore at Burlington High School sophomore guard, shoots over Wilmot’s Anthony Corona, left, and Korik Klein during their teams’ Southern Lakes Conference game earlier this month. As a precaution to prevent the spread of COVID-19, players have worn masks in high school athletics events, including in basketball and volleyball.

  GREGORY SHAVER, FOR THE JOURNAL TIMES

  Dr. Stephanie Sam, a hospitalist with Ascension All Saints Hospital, was one of the first frontline workers at the hospital?to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Administering the injection on Dec. 22 was Registered Nurse Cynthia Braun. This was part of the start of the country’s largest vaccination undertaking since Dr. Jonas Salk discovered the polio vaccine in 1955.

  COURTESY OF ASCENSION HEALTH